Logophiles and Wordsmiths group

My blog doesn’t have a specific theme, but it does lean in the direction of the subjects of writing, grammar, and general wordsmithery – not that the latter is an actual English word, but it is an example of what can be done when one smiths words.

I want to share a link to a Facebook group for those who love the English language. It is called “Logophiles and Wordsmiths”. It was born on Sunday, February 7, 2016, in British Columbia, Canada, weighing 8 lbs, 4 oz (just kidding on the weight), so at the time of this blog entry, it is still very new.

Check out the description. If you think you’d feel comfortable with such a group, I invite you to join. Please note, if you do not know how to properly use “your/you’re”, “there/their/they’re”, “where/were”, and other common English written words, this is not the place for you. This is our haven from the sights of poor writing. If you ever end a sentence with the personal pronoun “I”, you will be removed.

If improper writing chafes your butt, you might enjoy not only the break from seeing such textual indiscretions, but also the camaraderie of others who appreciate and strive for fine English writing.

Oh, but we are not a stodgy bunch! There has been a lot of laughter in there, and I anticipate more of it.

Here is the link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/logophilesandwordsmiths/

I hope to see some more logophiles and wordsmiths in the group soon!

logophiles and wordsmiths logo (2)

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Coffee Concoction for Weight Loss

A friend told me about this Valentus coffee stuff she’d been drinking that helped her lose weight. I had a few pounds to lose myself, but was frustrated by the lack of progress despite my best efforts that had worked in the past. After seven babies and nearing the age of 50, maintaining my ideal weight became a challenge.

I decided to give it a try and was impressed with the results. It’s not what I’d call cheap, working out to about $4.00 per day (our Canadian dollar is not good lately, but the product comes from the States, so it is cheaper for those who live there), which is less than what one would spend on something hot and delicious in a cafe, and, as it cuts cravings, it causes you to spend less on other treats in said cafe or fast food joints, and can make a dent in your grocery bill in general.

It is one of those “multi level marketing” things, and I am not a fan of those, but as it does help with weight loss and thus increase one’s health level, I feel I’d be amiss to NOT share it. Here is a link for it if you’d like to know more:

http://www.myvalentus.com/steeny

Motorcycle Mama

Me at my ideal weight in 2013 – 5 more lbs to go

 

 

Herbatophile – new word for “tea freak”

There should be a word that means “someone who loves tea”. The phrase “tea freak” isn’t suitable to describe the gentle mingling of pleasantly scented herbs with the drinker of such concoctions.

The word for “tea”, though, in Greek isn’t much help – tsai. Even Latin doesn’t have a better translation for it. Spanish, French, German, Italian, and so many others also have words too similar to “tea” for it to sound nice with the Greek suffix of “phile” for “loving”.

Polish has “herbata” for tea, so… herbatophile? Can I mix Polish and Greek? Yes, I can! Bibliophile is French mixed with Greek for one who loves books, so… herbatophile it is. I think it is a harmonious blend for those who appreciate the warming pleasure of a good cup of tea.

I am a herbatophile. Are you?

(Edited to add a pronunciation description: herb-AT-o-file.)