When creativity fails #amwriting

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

Every writer has moments when creativity fails them. We sit before our computer and the words refuse to come, or when they do, they seem awkward. At times like this, we feel alone and isolated. After all, an idea is jammed in our head and words should fall from our fingers like water from the tap.

I have suffered this, the same as every author does. However, it never gets too firm a grip on me because I have several exercises that help me write my way through the block. Something we sometimes forget is that the act of writing every day builds mental muscle tone and keeps you fit and in thehabit ofwriting.

Every author suffers a dry spell now and then. Even so, this job requires us to practice, just like music or dancing. Doing well at anything artistic or sports related requires discipline. Just like…

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Fantasy Breeds Creativity

“Without playing with fantasy no creative work has ever yet come to birth. The debt we owe to the play of imagination is incalculable.”

 

~some Swiss psychiatrist

 

(From my Google Plus account, October 18, 2011. I only went there because I got emails telling me Google Plus is shutting down and I needed to archive it if I ever wanted to see any of it again. I haven’t gone to it in years. It was never catchy for me, anyway.)

 

Sad scenes and happy outcomes

Sad scenes are sometimes necessary to bring out twice the joy when there’s a happy outcome.

Not only does this apply in the world of writing, but it is also applicable to eternity for those of us whose faith is in Christ.

I think of Romans 8:18, which in the King James Version says, “For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us.”

This keeps me going through so many agonies. Hallelujah for this blessed knowledge!

romans 8 18

 

 

Writing Without Cussing

If someone’s going to write a book, a play, or a movie – or even an internet post – they should produce it with proper dialogue and good words.

Creative words.

Don’t stick to the lameness of reality with its knee-jerk cussing.

Go out on a limb of higher verbiage.

There is time, when writing as opposed to speaking, to cultivate creative communication.

Handel Wrote Messiah in a 24-Day Manic Episode

Video

While talking with my counselor today (yes, she meets with clients in her home office on weekends, and that’s the only way I can fit it in, so it works perfectly for me), we discussed PTSD, anxiety, and bipolar disorder.

I may have all three of those, and so I will be talking to a psychiatrist to find out for sure. (UPDATE: The psychiatrist says I don’t have bipolar disorder – I was just going through some heavy stuff at that time – but PTSD and anxiety for sure.)

I was impressed to hear from my counselor that Handel wrote “Messiah” during a 24-day manic phase.

Impressed, but not at all surprised.

Knowing what I myself can do in a … in a … OK, I’ll say it … “MANIC PHASE” … if that is what I have … I can totally imagine such an exquisite compilation of music being created in that space of time.

I once wrote an elaborate song for a friend, based on one sentence he wrote. He was speechless that I did it in the space of an afternoon.

Actually, it wasn’t even “an afternoon” – I banged it out in less than an hour.

Anyway, I hope someone else enjoys Handel’s Messiah as they stumble across it in my blog. I am listening to it in my headset right now, while working on some weekly home school reports I need to submit to the school where a couple of my sons are enrolled. The music blocks out the sound of the TV, which my husband is watching in the next room. I hate TV. I chalk that up to my high sensitivity.

I don’t think I’ve ever asked a question before in my blogging, having thus far blogged more for my own sanity than for communication —  although, I do love it when people leave comments — but I will throw a few questions out now for whatever they are worth, and I hope you will answer at least one (but the more, the merrier):

1. Did you read this whole thing?
2. What brought you here?
3. Do you like Handel’s Messiah?
4. Has anything I have written today resonated with you in any way?

Thank you for reading my ramblings.