A Wordpress “Slug”

I opted to upgrade to the new setup WordPress has for us bloggers. I’m not sure if the page where we create our blog is called a “dashboard” now, or if it is something else, but whatever it is has got a new field called “Slug”.

I had to Google to find out what this slug meant. My, how words have exploded in meaning since Webster’s paperback dictionaries were some of my dearest companions.

So, the new meaning of a slug, at least here on WordPress, is a user-friendly URL for your post’s link, so it’s not a string of characters with the title of your blog entry possibly woven in.

Here is a link for a brief article on the WPBeginners page that describes it better:

WordPress “slug” meaning

That’s all. Happy Word Pressing!

 

 

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Writing Without Cussing

If someone’s going to write a book, a play, or a movie – or even an internet post – they should produce it with proper dialogue and good words.

Creative words.

Don’t stick to the lameness of reality with its knee-jerk cussing.

Go out on a limb of higher verbiage.

There is time, when writing as opposed to speaking, to cultivate creative communication.

Writing With A Pen

For me, there is something therapeutic about picking up a ball-point pen and watching the letters form on a fresh page, especially those first words in a new notebook. The word “sacred” comes to mind.

Whether I write via ink or through the wonders of electronic transmission, getting the words out is the main thing. Still, something about pen and paper beckons to me. Perhaps it is the relative simplicity, where no electricity or electronics are involved, giving more of a sense of creating something from my mind and connecting to the result.

bursting-heart-pen

I read an article today on the subject of writing by hand. I find it to be inspiring. Here it is.

The Simple Joy of Writing by Hand

 

Herbatophile – new word for “tea freak”

There should be a word that means “someone who loves tea”. The phrase “tea freak” isn’t suitable to describe the gentle mingling of pleasantly scented herbs with the drinker of such concoctions.

The word for “tea”, though, in Greek isn’t much help – tsai. Even Latin doesn’t have a better translation for it. Spanish, French, German, Italian, and so many others also have words too similar to “tea” for it to sound nice with the Greek suffix of “phile” for “loving”.

Polish has “herbata” for tea, so… herbatophile? Can I mix Polish and Greek? Yes, I can! Bibliophile is French mixed with Greek for one who loves books, so… herbatophile it is. I think it is a harmonious blend for those who appreciate the warming pleasure of a good cup of tea.

I am a herbatophile. Are you?

(Edited to add a pronunciation description: herb-AT-o-file.)